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  1. #1
    Senior Pro racer Cam's Avatar
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    Exclamation Helmet Standards

    Some interesting things are happening in regards helmets right now on a regulatory front (I know I am sad!)

    If you like writing submissions to enquiries in your spare time, then there is a really important one currently pending that will affect the future of motorcycle helmet supply law within Australia - http://www.productsafety.gov.au/cont...itemId/1002090

    The ACCC are presenting three options and recommending that Option One is the preferred alternative. This option recommends that each state road authority be allowed to decide which ‘standard’ (e.g. AS 1698) and hence which helmets we can use when we ride. The reasoning in their document is pretty incoherent if you ask me and seems to centre squarely around stickers and making enforcement easier. Stickers and enforcement don’t make helmets safer. Greater choice, newer standards, larger markets and better regulation make safer helmets.

    Option two recommends that European, Japanese and US standards are very similar to AS1698 and there is no compelling reason helmets meeting those standards should not be available for use on Australian roads. This is how it works in New Zealand currently. Option Two would be a great outcome for Australian riders. It would offer greater choice and likely more advanced helmets for our use. It should also promote competition by removing the reliance on a singular standard.

    In NSW, if you have a large head (>62cm and a medical certificate to certify this) you can apply for an exemption to the AS1698 standard rule and use helmets from these other standards. This was courtesy of a recent ministerial in the government gazettes. So why not simply allow this for all riders, all the time?

    I’ll be writing a submission response and encouraging as many riders from all walks of life to do the same even if only a brief email.

    This will apply to all riders in all states of Australia.
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  2. #2
    Senior superstar Boof's Avatar
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    Option would be the best i think as well
    More choice for us
    Now hideing in the fitness protection program


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  3. #3
    P Plater posty trumpy's Avatar
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    Come on gang , get your submissions in or these dickheads will have us changing helmets at state borders. Where do these f&$%# wits dream this shit up at. I sent my submission two days ago.
    Trumpy

  4. #4
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    Put submission in ages ago !

    But

    No idea whats happening with this ?

    But here is an interesting article posted by MCC

    http://synapse.org.au/get-the-facts/...i3sL0.facebook

    Motorbike Helmets and Brain Injury Prevention
    While recommending particular brands of helmets is beyond the scope of this article, it hopefully provides pointers in maximising your safety when it's time to buy a new skid lid. If you ride, be sure to share this article with your mates.

    Choosing the best motorbike helmet can substantially reduce your chances of acquiring a brain injury in a crash.
    Wearing motorbike helmets can reduce the chances of death by 42% and the chances of a brain injury by a huge 69%.1 With figures like that, every motorbike rider should be aware of the helmet standards, new research and proven innovations in helmet design.

    Lack of research & old standards

    There is surprisingly little research or consistent effort to improve helmet design. The few rigorous research reports that exist can be up to two decades old. Why? Helmet manufacturers generally feel all they need to do is meet the required helmet standards. The helmet standards are mostly set by government departments, so there is little motivation to update and improve the standards they have set.

    Smaller helmet manufacturers occasionally put forward new designs for improved safety. However, the question then is whether the designs are tested by qualified independent researchers, how rigorous their methodology was, and whether the results are published in a peer-reviewed journal - the gold standard for quality research.


    First, the good news

    If all of this sounds like glum news, it shouldn't be. A comprehensive European study in 1996 called COST 3274 found that a wide sample of helmets complying with various safety standards all consistently did a good job.



    How good a job? There is room for improvement. The study suggested a possible 20% improvement if standards were revised to include design features for improved helmet safety. Here are some key considerations next time you buy a helmet.



    Improving Helmet Safety

    Dual density liners

    The foam in your helmet is the main key to protecting your head. Recently, some manufacturers started using a second softer layer of foam for comfort and a better fit, especially for heads a bit differently shaped to the norm. A lucky spin-off was improved safety. The COST 327 study10 found that dual density liners could reduce injury in lighter impacts as the softer liner cushioned the head more effectively. A 2001 Australian study5 showed that these liners, of a specific type, had characteristics that might improve helmet effectiveness, but did not necessarily prove the effectiveness of dual density liners. To date, none of the helmet standards have been updated in this regard.


    Rotational injuries

    Brain injury research increasingly shows that many brain injuries occur due to the sudden rotation of the brain (or angular acceleration), as well as the direct impact itself.6 This is relevant to motorbike riders as often the head hits the road surface at an angle. A USA study has confirmed this kind of injury among football players.7 The COST 327 study concluded that helmet design should insist on a minimum tendency to induce rotational motion by minimising external projections from the helmet shell (e.g. air vents).8

    Mills, et al speculate that increasing the ability of helmets to to absorb direct impacts should also reduce rotational effects.

    Currently there are two developments that claim to protect against rotational injuries. The first uses a gel coating on the helmet that moves when hit at an angle to reduce rotational forces. The second approach incorporates a kind of suspension inside the helmet shell to dissipate rotational forces from an oblique impact on the helmet. In both cases, the helmet manufacturers have contracted independent researchers to run tests, but the full reports are not available for scrutiny, and also have not been published in peer-reviewed journals.

    It is interesting to note that many riders are now attaching small video cameras to their helmets to film their ride. There is no research yet to see how much this increases the chances of rotational injuries, but logic suggests it could have a bearing in some impacts.

    Flexible outer shell

    Only a small number of motor bike accidents result in penetration of the outer shell of the helmet. The COST 327 study found that most helmets are too stiff and only absorb impacts efficiently at levels that are not survivable. Currently the European helmet standard is the only one that requires the helmet shell to be flexible (ECE22).

    Wear a full face helmet

    Most head injuries are sustained at the front of the head, with more than two thirds of skull fractures involving chin impact12. While open face helmets are seen as stylish for scooter riders, and some riders find full face helmets claustrophobic, a full face helmet does reduce the chances of head injury. The chin guard reduces forces transmitted along the jaw that can cause a lethal base-of-skull injury (where your brain stem connects with your spinal cord), and also reduces rotational forces that can lead to a diffuse brain injury.9

    It is important that the chin guard not be too stiff, and it should also be padded to reduce the chances of brain injury.12 Currently only Snell and the European standards test the chin guard.

    Helmet fit is everything

    It is critical for a helmet to fit snugly. Accident statistics reveal that in roughly 10% of motorbike accidents the helmet does not stay on the rider's head.10 This can be due to a helmet that is too large and/or not doing up the helmet strap sufficiently tight. A good check is to simply push upward with force against your helmet from various directions and see how far it moves - the results can be disturbing!

    Never buy a helmet you haven't personally tried on your head to ensure the correct fit, no matter how cheap online shopping may be.


    Buying a Helmet in Australia

    Helmets from large international companies who make and market their own helmet are generally very reliable, arising from an internal safety culture - no amount of certification can add quality to a helmet if the manufacturer didn't build it in. Large production runs usually ensure the required density of the foam remains at a consistent level to best protect your head.

    Any new helmet used on the road must comply with the Australian Standard AS/NZS 1698:2006, but Australia is a very small market so many manufacturers don't bother getting compliance for their helmets here. Some riders may buy a helmet from overseas (e.g. one that complies with the more comprehensive European standard) and risk the chance of a fine should the police inspect the helmet.

    The largest risk is buying a helmet that has poor quality control in production. Why? Manufacturers usually only do short production runs to service a unique standard, such as the tiny market of Australia. There are definitely problems with reliability of helmet Certification in Australia.


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  5. #5
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    Continued

    Which helmets are legal in which states?
    Another problem with helmet certification in Australia is the States have there own requirements that often clash. A key problem is that many organisations are involved, but there is no overall coordination by one governing body to ensure consistency across Australia.


    The Australian Consumer Law 2011, requires that any motorbike helmet supplied to the market must meet the Commonwealth mandatory standard (Consumer Protection Notice No.9) which is based on AS 1698-1988. However, Road Rules around the country now require that when using roads, a rider must wear a helmet in compliance with AS/NZS 1698:2006, a completely revised Standard with different test methods. Road Rules in some areas also include requirements for a "sticker" to aid Police enforcement.


    Northern Territory & Queensland simply require "compliance with AS/NZS 1698:2006" but with no additional "sticker"requirement.


    New South Wales Road Rules were changed without warning in February 2010 and now demand that an approved helmet complies with at least one version of AS/NZS 1698 and also "has an identifying mark from a body accredited or approved by the Joint Accreditation System of Australia and New Zealand certifying compliance with an above standard". As a result, the helmets of thousands of NSW riders were made retrospectively illegal on NSW roads on February 2010.


    ACT, Victoria, Tasmania, South Australia & Western Australia: A helmet that is legal for road use under the new NSW Road Rules is illegal to use in the these States according to their State laws!

    Police in the ACT are instructed to look for a helmet that "has applied to it the certification trade mark of which the Standards Association of Australia".

    In Victoria, the police are told to look for a helmet that is "marked with an official standards mark certifying compliance with the relevant Standard". In Tasmania, the helmet must bear "the Australian Standards Mark", in South Australia the helmet must bear "the certification mark of the Standards Association of Australia", and in Western Australia must carry "a sticker issued by Standards Australia".

    The problem? None of these exist! Standards Australia was broken up and sold to private buyers in December 2003 and has not issued any stickers or markings since then. Technically, it is impossible to buy any helmet you can legally use on the road in these States. This only touches on some of the inconsistencies with ensuring a helmet is legal. For a more comprehensive list, visit http://www.roadrider.com.au/special-...ate-of-helmets and read "State of Helmets". Written in 2011, many Road Rules have changed since which have further confused the situation. The ACCC has recently commenced a Review of the mandatory Standard in addition to managing recalls from the Australian marketplace of a number of helmets Certified by JAS-ANZ accredited certifiers.


    Which is the best helmet standard?

    This is a valid question. Regarded by many as the gold standard, the Snell helmet standard was criticised after claims that Snell-approved helmets were far too stiff in the outer shell and could cause more brain injuries as a result.11

    Generally, helmet standards do a reasonable job of protecting the head, both in rich and poor nations.13 But none of the standards are up-to-date with current research, and few have incorporated recommendations that were made more than a decade ago.


    In the course of writing this article, we spoke to Guy Stanford, the Australian Motorcycle Council Helmets Committee Chair. He believes the European motorcycle helmet Regulation is definitely a cut above the average, because it's motorbike-specific, has higher impact attenuation, a valid chin-bar test and an oblique impact test. The problem in Australia is finding a European-approved helmet that complies with the Australian standard too.


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  6. #6
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    18 December 2013
    Subject: UPDATE - petition for consistent national helmet standard and rules


    Thanks for signing the petition, at this stage it's only been mentioned on three forums and is about to reach 500 signatures.

    A lot of motorbike clubs which be mentioning this in their next newsletter to members, and several major motorbike magazines will be doing articles on the issue so it should really take off over the next two months.

    In the mean time, I would urge you to pass the link on to friends who ride (if you haven't done so already).

    Forcing our politicians to act on this will definitely result in a win for all riders in terms of improved helmet safety, a wide choice and more bang for our buck when buying a new helmet!

    regards,
    Barry Morris
    General Editor
    Synapse - the brain injury magazine
    www.synapse.org.au


    Laws for sale of helmets require that helmets comply with CPN9

    http://www.productsafety.gov.au/cont...mItemId/971517



    You will note that CPN 9 is based on the 1988 version of AS 1698



    Road Rules require you to use a helmet in compliance with a different Standard, the voluntary standard AS/NZS 1698:2006.



    On top of that, Road Rules require different stickers than required by the voluntary standard.



    Road Rules in WA, SA, Tas, ACT require stickers that don’t exist, hence compliance with the road rule is impossible in those states.



    The Victorian road rule is drafted so badly, it is impossible to tell what is actually required for compliance.



    NSW, NT and Qld have definitions that are equally confusing.



    Overall, we have no consistency between laws for sale and laws for use.

    CPN 9 makes alteration to AS 1698-1988 to allow it to align with the Australian Consumer Law, administered equally in all States and Territories by Consumer Affairs or Fair Trading Departments.



    Frankly, there are no helmets on the market that are, strictly speaking, legal to sell.

    However, there is no offence when buying one.



    The petition is calling upon the Road Authorities to reference ONLY CPN 9 in road rules.

    The ACCC is presently in the process of Reviewing CPN 9

    The ACCC Review is considering adding to CPN 9, helmets in compliance with the national standards of Europe, USA and Japan as equivalents to the Australian standard.



    The Australian Motorcycle Council has been working on this for a couple of years and now needs a little extra push to get this crap sorted and gain consistency for sale and use and open the marketplace for both helmets and Certification services (overseas Certifiers are blocked from entering the Australian market and you’re paying for that)


    Guy


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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boof View Post
    We in Queensland are trend setters

    Change coming to motorcycle helmet laws

    http://motorbikewriter.com/change-mo...e-helmet-laws/
    .............
    Standards Australia has invited members of the public to participate in the February forum in Sydney to discuss changes to helmet laws.
    ....................
    Australian Motorcycle Council spokesman Guy Stanford says, while he is hopeful and optimistic, he fears the forum “is a game of market protection”.

    “The forum is only going to deal with how standards are referenced in legislation. Standards Australia will have their own agenda. There will be a series of speakers and who they are will set the agenda. Possibly none of us will be able to speak. We don’t know what their agenda will be.”
    ..........
    The forum comes in the wake of recent changes in Queensland to helmet laws where the Australian testing requirement was axed in preference for United Nations standards. That means helmets approved in Japan, Europe and America will be acceptable. This is likely to lead to cheaper helmets, but it could also lead to Queensland riders being fined for non-compliant helmets when riding interstate.
    Alison says the forum is not in response to the Queensland amendments: “Standards Australia decided to host this forum in an attempt to see more harmonisation of regulatory requirements across jurisdictions and to look at ways to further develop the Australian Standard (AS/NZS 1698:2006) and harmonise it with other standards in the world.”
    Forum to be held Feb 19th
    Invites already sent out to relevant cross section of groups/individuals.

    Motorcycle helmets
    http://www.tmr.qld.gov.au/Safety/Que...oad-rules.aspx

    New rules for motorcycle helmets (QUEENSLAND)

    Currently, motorcycle riders on Queensland roads are required to wear a helmet that complies with Australian standard AS1698 or AS/NZS1698. From early 2015, the range of motorcycle helmets approved for use in Queensland will be expanded to include those complying with the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (ECE) 22.05 standard.

    Reasons for the changes

    For road safety reasons, all motorcycle riders on Queensland roads must wear an approved motorcycle helmet securely fitted and fastened on their head. Restricting available helmets to those that meet Australian standards limits the range of helmets available and sometimes the sizing is unsuitable, particularly for people with larger heads. Helmets meeting ECE standards have a similar safety record to those meeting Australian standards, so from early 2015 the range of helmets approved for use in Queensland will be expanded to include those that meet the ECE 22.05 standard.

    What about motorcycle passengers

    Pillion and sidecar passengers will also be able to wear helmets complying with the ECE 22.05 standard in addition to helmets complying with the Australian standards.

    Buying a helmet meeting the European standard

    Australian consumer law currently restricts the sale of helmets in Australia to those that comply with Australian standards so it would be an offence for a retailer to sell other helmets. However, Queenslanders will be able to legally buy helmets meeting the ECE 22.05 standard through international online retailers or if they are travelling overseas.

    Penalties for breaking the motorcycle helmet rules

    A fine of $341 and 3 demerit points will continue to apply to motorcycle riders or passengers who break the motorcycle helmet rules. Double demerit points still apply for second or subsequent offences within a 12-month period of failing to wear a helmet.

    Helmet labels and stickers

    To make sure the helmets meet the ECE 22.05 standard and to support enforcement activities, helmets approved under the standard will be required to display a label certifying compliance with the standard. The regulations governing the ECE 22.05 standard currently require the display of such labels (for example, a sticker on the outside of the helmet or a stitched label on the inside of the helmet).

    Helmet standards elsewhere in Australia

    Currently other Australian states and territories only allow helmets approved under Australian standards, although some jurisdictions are reviewing helmet standards. Motorcycle riders and passengers should be aware that after Queensland has expanded its helmet range in early 2015, it will still be an offence to wear a helmet approved under the ECE 22.05 standard when riding in other Australian states or territories
    .


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  8. #8
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    Helmet Standards VIC

    From MCC

    Be aware that Victoria Police appear to have a current campaign to charge people who either have cameras on their helmets or are using dark visors.
    Four riders have recently been charged for "not wearing approved helmet" for using dark visors. The common thread appears to be that the riders were pulled over, told they had done nothing wrong then charged with the above offence.

    The dark visor issue is particularly aggravating. There is a standard for visors and it details how much light a visor must allow through. It appears to be based on European conditions meaning that the allowable tint is extremely slight - much lower than that allowed for tints on car windows.

    However, it also appears that it is quite legal to sell visors that do not comply with the Standard. That is, there is little defence to these charges.
    The Australian Motor Cycle Council (AMC) is also aware of outstanding court cases involving similar charges for use of cameras on helmets. The Police are interpreting Vic RR 270 as meaning AS 1698 is an in-service requirement, and not just as a requirement for sale of the helmet. The road rule has been so poorly constructed that this interpretation is, according to high level legal advice, valid.

    Under this interpretation ANY attachment to a helmet could make it illegal. It also means that riders should ensure that the booklet for use and care of the helmet must be attached at all times (requirement for sale of a helmet under the standard). There are also other ramifications.

    Yeah, this is stupid!
    No helmet is legal for sale in Victoria (don't comply with mandatory standard).

    No helmet is legal to use in Victoria (unlikely to comply with RR 270 as interpreted by Vic Police).

    The matter is being taken up with VicRoads by AMC. It also supplies us with ammunition to take to the Standards Australia forum in Feb 2015.
    This has got totally out of hand!
    More on Helmet Cams here > http://forums.ratscafe.org/showthrea...hlight=cameras

    The forum comes in the wake of recent changes in Queensland to helmet laws where the Australian testing requirement was axed in preference for United Nations standards. That means helmets approved in Japan, Europe and America will be acceptable. This is likely to lead to cheaper helmets, but it could also lead to Queensland riders being fined for non-compliant helmets when riding interstate.
    Really are some good reasons for National Standards


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  9. #9
    Senior superstar Boof's Avatar
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    New helmet laws in Qld

    I know there is a thread somewhere on this but could not find it
    They finely have passed the laws here .
    http://www.tmr.qld.gov.au/Safety/Que...oad-rules.aspx
    Now hideing in the fitness protection program


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  10. #10
    P Plater Pro racer Rob's Avatar
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    Good to see some common sense at play in QLD Boof.

    How long has it taken?

    Was it a way to piss in the pockets of those outraged by the VLAD laws or a genuine move to join the 21st Century?
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